Stieg Larsson

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is the first novel in The Millennium Trilogy.

It was published in 2005, one year after the author Stieg Larsson’s death.The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
It received The Glass Key Award form Crime Writers of Scandinavia in 2006.
According to figures from June 2011, the Millennium Trilogy has together sold 60 million copies in more than 50 countries.  

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – Plot summary

Disgraced journalist Mikael Blomqvist is hired by Henrik Vanger to investigate the disappearance of Vanger’s great-niece Harriet. Henrik suspects that someone in his family, the powerful Vanger clan, murdered Harriet over forty years ago.

Starting his investigation, Mikael realizes that Harriet’s disappearance is not a single event, but rather linked to series of gruesome murders in the past. He now crosses paths with Lisbeth Salander, a young computer hacker, an asocial punk and most importantly, a young woman driven by her vindictiveness.

Together they form an unlikely couple as they dive deeper into the violent past of the secretive Vanger family.

479 comments on “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo”

  • admin says:

    I use to read detective novels. Millenium is one of the best ones I read for years. Kill your TV and read Millenium.

    - Gil, a French in Vienna,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    I use to read detective novels. Millenium is one of the best ones I read for years. Kill your TV and read Millenium.

    - Gil, a French in Vienna,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    Simply fantastic, stricly recommended..

    - Marco Lecis – Italy,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    Simply fantastic, stricly recommended..

    - Marco Lecis – Italy,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    This book is very well written and, even in with occassional translation artifacts, has a layered depth that is rare in crime fiction. Again and again I’m being impressed by the crime fiction being written in Sweden and Denmark. The sophistication of the writing in this book provides a strong indicator of this trend.

    The small segment of the narrative that takes place in Australia was reasonably accurately drawn. This suggests that Stieg must have been here. I agree that the title is silly and that a closer transliteration of the original would be better support for the themes in the book. Overall one of the best pieces of crime writing I’ve read for years.

    - Paul – Sydney Australia,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    This book is very well written and, even in with occassional translation artifacts, has a layered depth that is rare in crime fiction. Again and again I’m being impressed by the crime fiction being written in Sweden and Denmark. The sophistication of the writing in this book provides a strong indicator of this trend.

    The small segment of the narrative that takes place in Australia was reasonably accurately drawn. This suggests that Stieg must have been here. I agree that the title is silly and that a closer transliteration of the original would be better support for the themes in the book. Overall one of the best pieces of crime writing I’ve read for years.

    - Paul – Sydney Australia,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    Just finished “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” in English… a great read that got me thoroughly hooked. One complaint, though: the writing is often awkward and stilted — the fault, I assume, of the translation and not the author. Indeed, I note from some Internet postings that the translator himself appears none too happy with what the British publisher did to his work. In any event, since the rest of the series will not be available in English for years, I have just begun the second book, “La fille qui rêvait d’un bidon d’essence et d’une allumette” (in French, obviously), and find it to be far more fluent and readable. Note to Knopf: you still have time to do a better English version of the next two books, and improve the translation of the first one before it is published here in the U.S. Oh, yes, and how about restoring the original title?

    - Bernard,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    Just finished “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” in English… a great read that got me thoroughly hooked. One complaint, though: the writing is often awkward and stilted — the fault, I assume, of the translation and not the author. Indeed, I note from some Internet postings that the translator himself appears none too happy with what the British publisher did to his work. In any event, since the rest of the series will not be available in English for years, I have just begun the second book, “La fille qui rêvait d’un bidon d’essence et d’une allumette” (in French, obviously), and find it to be far more fluent and readable. Note to Knopf: you still have time to do a better English version of the next two books, and improve the translation of the first one before it is published here in the U.S. Oh, yes, and how about restoring the original title?

    - Bernard,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    It’s nice to see a mystery actually engaging some genuine issues, and the writing is feverish, sharp, and mesmerizing. It’s embarrassing, however, for the English publisher to have replaced the original “Men Who Hate Women” with such a ludicrous, anodyne title as “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.” The original title has everything to do with the novel’s themes. The presumably more marketable replacement is completely arbitrary (they could just as easily have called it “The Family with the Ugly Secret” or “The Village in the North of Sweden” or some such ilk). But don’t let that dissuade you from reading what is an utterly engaging and intelligent mystery, unlike anything I’ve read, with themes that elevate the book from the mystery genre into something close to literature.

    - Scott in San Francisco,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    It’s nice to see a mystery actually engaging some genuine issues, and the writing is feverish, sharp, and mesmerizing. It’s embarrassing, however, for the English publisher to have replaced the original “Men Who Hate Women” with such a ludicrous, anodyne title as “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.” The original title has everything to do with the novel’s themes. The presumably more marketable replacement is completely arbitrary (they could just as easily have called it “The Family with the Ugly Secret” or “The Village in the North of Sweden” or some such ilk). But don’t let that dissuade you from reading what is an utterly engaging and intelligent mystery, unlike anything I’ve read, with themes that elevate the book from the mystery genre into something close to literature.

    - Scott in San Francisco,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    One of the best book I’ve read. Suspens and good story. I’m starting the 2nd.

    - Geraldine Palau,

    Reply to this comment


  • admin says:

    One of the best book I’ve read. Suspens and good story. I’m starting the 2nd.

    - Geraldine Palau,

    Reply to this comment


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