Stieg Larsson

The legacy

Controversy surrounding the legacy

Stieg Larsson spent 32 years of his life with the architect Eva Gabrielsson. However, they never married, maybe due to Stieg’s dangerous work at the Expo-foundation. They did not have any children, and Stieg left no written will, so according to Swedish law, Stieg’s estate was inherited by his father and brother. This sparked a dispute between Eva Gabrielsson and Stieg’s relatives. She claims that they “were never a part of our lives” and that they are not the right persons handling Stieg’s estate.

A fact complicating the matter is that Eva has the laptop with the partly finished script for the content-images-stieglarsson_v2-right_books_offeringfourth book in the Millenium series. And she will not publish the script unless she is given the full rights to manage the novels in the Millenium series, the novels which she and Stieg worked with together. However, Stieg’s father and brother has not been willing to meet this amend, and this has resulted in a stalemate which has lasted the five years since Stieg’s death.

The most recent event took place when Stieg’s father and brother in an interview with a newspaper offered Eva a final settlement of € 2 million. She rejected the offer, saying that it is not the money she is after, but the legal rights to administrate the literary property of Stieg.

So the stalemate continues, and the final words have not been said.

777 comments on “The legacy”

  • Wouter says:

    Nice material for yet another book?…..

    Hope Eva can write as good as Stieg!

    - Wouter,


  • Catherine D, Vancouver, Canada says:

    I really hope they sort out their differences so the fourth book can be finished and published!

    - Catherine D, Vancouver, Canada,


  • Catherine D, Vancouver, Canada says:

    I really hope they sort out their differences so the fourth book can be finished and published!

    - Catherine D, Vancouver, Canada,


  • Paul, Australia says:

    Swedish Law needs serious amendment if a partner of 32 years is not recognized – how absurd.

    I agree with Eva, it is certainly not right. It surprises me that an otherwise enlightened country could be so conservative with unmarried partnerships.

    - Paul, Australia,


  • Paul, Australia says:

    Swedish Law needs serious amendment if a partner of 32 years is not recognized – how absurd.

    I agree with Eva, it is certainly not right. It surprises me that an otherwise enlightened country could be so conservative with unmarried partnerships.

    - Paul, Australia,


  • Rev Ben, Spain says:

    What the hell is going on with Swedish law? Are they still in the 17th century? My girlfriend is Swedish and I have always thought the country to be fairly progressive but their stance on common-law partnerships (Steig and Eva were together most of their adult lives) blows this opinion out of the water! Shame on Sweden and shame on the greedy, grasping Larssons….

    - Rev Ben, Spain,


    • Derf Salt Lake Ctiy, says:

      I agree with Mike. It is easy to judge without having the necessary factual knowledge. I hope that it all will work out in a righteous way and that the fourth volume will be soon on the shelves.

      - Henk Jansen,


    • admin says:

      Nowhere is it ever stated that she co

      -authored anything.

      - mike goins,


  • Rev Ben, Spain says:

    What the hell is going on with Swedish law? Are they still in the 17th century? My girlfriend is Swedish and I have always thought the country to be fairly progressive but their stance on common-law partnerships (Steig and Eva were together most of their adult lives) blows this opinion out of the water! Shame on Sweden and shame on the greedy, grasping Larssons….

    - Rev Ben, Spain,


    • Derf Salt Lake Ctiy, says:

      Stieg’s email to his brother 20 days before he died showed that he was on good terms with his family.And in the email, he takes sole credit for writing the books and talks about all the money he is going to make.The reality is that whatever is on the laptop about the fourth book does not belong to Eva. But Eva sounds so angry that you should worry that she’ll destroy it out of spite.

      - Bob,


    • admin says:

      Oh, give him a break! He is much better than my attempts at Swedish would be!

      - Me,


  • Ray Norberto/NYC says:

    Such stupidity and small thinking! The brother and father need to realize that all interests are best served – theirs, Eva’s and most importantly the worldwide fan base of the books – by all parties coming together. Empirically speaking, more money is to be made by both sides if they get past their perceived differences.

    - Ray Norberto/NYC,


  • judit fried says:

    What happened to Stieg’s mother?

    - judit fried,


  • Penny Waterfall says:

    Hold out Eva – I am amazed that in what I thought was a liberated country, Sweden is still operating such antiquated inheritance laws. If the brilliantly talented author spent his life with you, I am sure he intended you to have the major portion of his estate.

    - Penny Waterfall,


  • admin says:

    Where is Stieg’s mother? What happened to her?


    • zongezile, says:

      I think this comment summarizes my feelings very well. If WStieg’s family have any respect for him ( and they should be very grateful to him for all the money he has made them ) they should do their best to make peace with Eva. Granted, 2 million pounds sounds like a start. But both sides should come together and put aside their differences.And if they can’t, then Eva, write that last book and control that one. You deserve something for being with him all that time.

      - Mike R., Columbus Ohio,


  • admin says:

    Stiegs Father and Brother should bow their heads in shame and allow the love and deep caring Eva provided by giving her all rights to publish and finish this talented mans books. He was a genius and wished I had known them both, forget all the coffee his characters drank, I want to toast them with a bottle of wine. Call me anytime Eva, my book club would love you to visit. 312-446-4406 Wendy Cobrin Chicago, Illinois USA


  • Pranjal, New Delhi says:

    If the father and the brother have any respect and love for Stieg, they should allow Eva to take charge.

    - Pranjal, New Delhi,


    • Mike R., Columbus Ohio, says:

      I think you will find that in the UK (as in most countries), you need to make a will to ensure that partners inherit it that is what you wish to happen. It always pays to make a will.

      - Mary, Cornwall,


  • Hugh in Canada says:

    Sounds like Stieg’s family has more than a little Vanger in them.

    - Hugh in Canada,


  • diane, England says:

    I thought in this day and age, whatever country you lived in, the long time partner was the benificiary after death, whether or not there was a will. Saying that, after reading the trilogy Sweden does seem to have some very strange laws.

    - diane, England,


    • Mary, Cornwall, says:

      I totally agree, it’s a great shame that Steig and his partner, Eva didn’t legalize their union. It’s just a quick piece of paper! As smart as these two professionals were why didn’t they at least write out wills? How stupid! As busy as he was it doesn’t sound like he had much time for her. However, I do feel sorry for Eva. I think perhaps the Swedish legal system does protect women in regards to inheritance. A marriage certificate is proof of the union. A woman can inherit. All these other comments of people whining about why Eva doesn’t get the royalties and rights from her lover’s books is just silly. They were smart people that neglected to do something smart and easy. This teaches everyone a lesson. After all how do we really know that Eva and Steig were together for 32 years. Do we just rely on what their friends say. How do we know if they were faithful to each other. Perhaps they had lots of other lovers, like some of the characters in Steig’s books. Well, I do hope Eva continues to fight for her claim, though not legal, but perhaps moral. I would support her if I knew she was the true partner of Steig.

      - Jasmin,


  • D.N. says:

    How can two fairly sane grown-ups not know, or care to find out, what the law says? Nobody is immortal. If you neglect to write a will, then your relatives will suffer the consequences.

    - D.N.,


    • Jasmin, says:

      YES!!!!!

      - D Eltherington,


    • D Eltherington, says:

      I don’t see how you can claim that Sweden has done more for women’s rights than any country in the world, if they don’t even accept common law marriage… and for 32 years. How appalling.

      - M. Duryea, Atlanta, GA,


    • Zee Hyman, says:

      I agree

      - TD Melbourne Australia,


    • Leslie Minnesota, says:

      And men are greedy! They look at women like cows. It is a society like Belgium one where women are second class; so the law will not make her any good by being a women.

      - L Barcenas, 12 November 2011


  • Dorothy Wodrich says:

    I am amazed that Larsson’s father and brother have been allowed to “take over” as they have done. His partner of 32 years, who was part of the writing process, should be the one who inherits. It is positively pre-historic that the rights of a life partner can be disregarded in this way.

    There is little doubt in my mind that the only thing that the father and brother are concerned about is the money. If the books had not been best sellers, they would not have bothered to lay any claim on them. The Swedish legal system needs to drag itself into the 21st Century and do the right thing.

    - Dorothy Wodrich,


  • Lilladyvinyl says:

    Can not believe that 32 years with someone, counts for nothing. Why don’t they take a book each and split the 4th one 3 ways?

    Am going through similar problems with my father’s estate. If this is a lesson to anyone, it’s that you are never too young or too old to write a will!

    - Lilladyvinyl,


  • Trina says:

    I really hope the Larsson family comes to their senses and gives the rights to Eva….

    - Trina,


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